methodology & theory

Grounded Theory in Software Engineering

Grounded Theory (GT) has proved an extremely useful research approach in several fields including medical sociology, nursing, education and management theory. However, GT is a complex method based on an inductive paradigm that is fundamentally different from the traditional hypothetico-deductive research model. As there are at least three variants of GT, some ostensibly GT research suffers from method slurring, where researchers adopt an arbitrary subset of GT practices that are not recognizable as GT. In this paper, we describe the variants of GT and identify the core set of GT practices. We then analyze the use of grounded theory in software engineering. We carefully and systematically selected 98 articles that mention GT, of which 52 explicitly claim to use GT, with the other 46 using GT techniques only. Only 16 articles provide detailed accounts of their research procedures. We offer guidelines to improve the quality of both conducting and reporting GT studies. The latter is an important extension since current GT guidelines in software engineering do not cover the reporting process, despite good reporting being necessary for evaluating a study and informing subsequent research.

Uncovering Theories in Software Engineering

Our paper “Uncovering Theories in Software Engineering” was accepted in the Second Workshop on a General Theory of Software Engineering (GTSE), collocated with ICSE 2013. One of the key points that we make in this paper is that SE research already has bits of theories, that we call Theory Fragments, and we adopted a framework offered by Brinberg and McGrath that can help to dissect papers so as to identify those fragments. You can find a preprint of the paper here.